Posted By Araminta Grey Posted On

Bonnie Tyler Survives The 80s In Cambrils

Among the meager drip of international figures this summer, a striking presence: Bonnie Tyler, an unpublished singer in Barcelona, whom we saw for the first time on a Catalan stage eight years ago at the short-lived Costa Music Festival, in Lloret, and that this Saturday he appeared at another point on the coast, the Cambrils Festival.

An opportunity to observe, through his ‘hits’ from another time, how an artist can continue to develop a career in its parallel reality, even if most of humanity is not taken for granted.

We’d be wrong to think that Bonnie Tyler has her career at a standstill, having released two albums in the last three years, the latest of which was the upbeat ‘The best is yet to come’, released in February.

Classic FM rock material, with its emotionality and its epic, with titles, which it toured in Cambrils (concert that started 50 minutes late, apparently due to the storms of the previous hours), such as the melodious halftime ‘Hold on ‘or that’ power ballad ‘(his specialty) called’ Between the earth and the stars’, with its choral backgrounds (prerecorded) and its’ guitar hero ‘moment.

One more or less agrees to enjoy that musical aesthetic, it must be said that Tyler defended his with ardor, still wearing that beautiful cazalla voice,well preserved, beyond some trouble in the highest tones, after crossing the threshold of the 70s last June.

Before Tina Turner
The song that made her universal, ‘It’s a heartache’ (1977), sounded at the beginning, perhaps because its tenuous melancholy does not quite fit in with the bulk of her repertoire, more forceful, and it was convenient to get it out of the way soon.

Tyler was comforted to be offering her second concert in 16 months (after Friday’s in Madrid). Good humor when looking back, seeing herself as “the young lady who sang in front of the mirror with a toothbrush as a microphone”, and gestures of pride when pointing out that her admired Tina Turner adapted ‘The best’ two years later than her.

With so much past, the casualty count was inevitable, and evoked two important figures in his career who have left us this year: Steve Wolfe, the co-author of ‘Lost in France’, who died three weeks ago, and the “genius” Jim Steinman, who covered her in the 80s (after catapult to Meat Loaf), goes down last April.

From that pen came the loudest flashes of the night, the hyper-ballad ‘Total eclipse of the heart’, the baroque ‘Faster than speed of night’ and the metal-AOR landmark ‘Holding out for a hero’ (from the band sound of ‘Footloose’).

At that time of encores, Bonnie Tyler took the stage to greet, as in 2013 in Lloret, her husband, Robert (Sullivan), one Olympic judoka day, adding that they have been “48 years together”. The beast tamed, in a tender scene for the delight ‘camp’.

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