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Javier Ruibal Social Networks Are Our Vaccine Against Loneliness

From the pandemic abnormality, Javier Ruibal has produced a beautiful and airy work, a record-book of songs made with few ingredients, “showy and elegant”, placing the voice and the guitar in the foreground, and filtering the good humor between those landscapes dreamlike so typical of his poetic art.

The title of the album says it all: ‘Ruibal’, without more, because the singer-songwriter was not there to “look for flashy titles” and because he conceived it “absolutely alone”, he says. “And more Ruibal than this is not going to be.”

Thirteen premiere songs, each accompanied by a story written by the singer-songwriter and Sonia Alonso’s watercolors make up this work of physical care in times of digital preponderance, which Ruibal shows this Friday at the Joventut theater in L’Hospitalet ( inside Barnasants).

An album emerged from the darkness that does not recreate itself in it, but clings to the songs to transcend it. “I thought that when we left confinement I couldn’t tell people that I had been sad, and this helped me to focus,” reflects the troubadour from Cádiz. “And, after all, if the human being has come this far, how can he not continue?”

Technology that unites
The song ‘Amor en la red’ opens the album, in which Ruibal does not point to the helpful contempt for virtual links: thank goodness we have had ‘WhatsApp’ or Instagram in these times of home isolation, he comes to tell us.

“Before, it seemed corny to me to put an emoticon with a little heart, and lately I have been swollen to do it,” confesses the musician, for whom “networks are our vaccine against loneliness. ” they said that technologies were going to destroy sincere communication ”.

In ‘Quantum Physics’, Ruibal sings of love “at the molecular level”, fitting with sportsmanship that the feeling “is reduced to an electric shock”, and in ‘Soy ese que cantaba’ he corners the melancholy for lost concerts and becomes practical pointing to the day when the stages open completely: “go and buy yourself a ticket / we invite you to Eden,” he demands.

There is a look at the trade and the “healing powers” of verses and chords in ‘Música en vena’, where he mentions colleagues from yesterday and today: Camarón, Ramones, Kiko Veneno … And Jorge Drexler, whose name also sneaks into ‘Muse’. “Because I’ve always admired him, and because he always has his muses tied to the side of the bed.”

With Imanol Uribe
The album includes his own version of ‘Intemperie’, the piece that in 2020 won the Goya for Best Original Song on the voice of Sílvia Pérez Cruz. The award represented something “exciting and beautiful”, without further consequences, he points out, although it guided a relationship with the director, Imanol Uribe, which has continuity, since Ruibal has delivered a new composition, ‘The truth wants to be told’, to his next film, ‘Julia’s Look’.

Although he regrets living “in a country that considers culture as something superfluous”, there are no signs of anger in this ‘Ruibal’. Kind impulses prevail, “avoiding the harsh”, with flashes of a humor that associates the beloved Javier Krahe, and a certain family aroma: production of his son, Javi Ruibal, and the tapping of his daughter Lucía, making themselves noticeable in the ( succinct) list of credits.

Both accompany him in his recitals, savoring “the pleasure of going out on the road together” and paying tribute, he adds, to Fernando Fernán Gómez’s film ‘The trip to nowhere’. The parental clan “as a network”, giving it “a greater meaning in these times when we perceive danger in our lives.”

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